Just Jurf Designs

The Basics: Wedding Invitations

Tips & TricksJenn JurfComment

It’s only fitting to kick off the blog by starting with the basics. Over the next few weeks, I will give a breakdown of each of the individual cards that is included in your invitation suite so that you can understand its significance. This will ensure that you’re adequately prepared to send out the perfect invites!

Your invitations are your guests’ first introduction to your wedding day. It sets the tone for style, formality and gives your guests a glimpse into what to expect on your big day. Your invitations are also a keepsake item that you’ll look back on when you’re older and share with future generations.

Above all, your invitations need to be practical. They communicate to your guests the necessary details for attending your wedding. Every word and every line has some sort of significance and this article will break that down for you.

Your Invitations, Line by Line

The Host Line

The host line is usually the first line(s) on the invitation and explains who is hosting the event. Whether it’s the couple themselves, one or both families, or all together, it’s proper etiquette to state who is hosting/inviting guests to the wedding.

Here are a few wording examples:

Together with their families

Mr. & Mrs. Jonathon Doe
Request the pleasure of your company
At the marriage of their daughter

Mr. & Mrs. Jonathon Doe
Together with Mr. & Mrs. Jonathon Doe
Request the pleasure of your company
At the marriage of their children

The request line can be done in two variations:
"Request the honor of your presence" when the ceremony is held in a place of worship
"Request the pleasure of your company" when the ceremony is held elsewhere


The Couple

The couple’s names will follow the host line. It’s traditional etiquette for the woman’s name to go first, followed by the man’s. For same sex couples, you can do it alphabetically. It’s a personal preference to include the first, middle and/or last names. Formal invitations will include all 3 names whereas, more informal invitations will include only first names.


Ceremony Date and Time

The ceremony date and time are shared on the invitations. Formal invitations spell out every word whereas informal invitations use numbers.

For example:

Saturday, the Tenth of August
Two thousand eighteen
at four o'clock in the afternoon

or

August 10, 2018 at 4pm

You're welcome to do a combination of the two if you're looking for a happy medium.

Here’s a tip for timing! If you decide to spell out the time of day and want to include “...in the morning/afternoon/evening”, here’s a reference:

Morning - up until 11:59am
Afternoon - from 12:00pm - 4:59pm
Evening - anything after 5:00pm


Location

The ceremony location details include the venue name, city and state address. Formal invitations include the full address on a details card whereas, more informal invitations include the full address on the invitation.

For example:

City Hall
San Francisco, California

City Hall
1 Dr Carlton B Goodlett Place
San Francisco, California 94102


Attire (optional)

When requesting specific attire, include the details on the bottom right corner of the invitation with a simple “Black Tie” or “Cocktail Attire” note.

If you need to elaborate on specific clothing items, this should be done on a details card. For example, “Women are not encouraged to wear heels as the ceremony will be held on grass.”


Well, what about…

This is where the wonderful world of details cards come into play. The above items are the only thing that should be included on your invitation so if you’d like to communicate other details, they should be done so separately. More on details cards in a few weeks!

Every couple is different, which makes every invitation unique in it’s own way. Your invitations should represent you as a couple and clearly communicate the style and feel of the overall wedding day.

I have addressed the most common questions I receive from clients when figuring out how to word their invitations. I’d be happy to answer any additional questions you may have with regard to wording your invitations in the comments below!

Mastered your invitation? Let's move on to your R.S.V.P. card (coming soon!)